Hard Cooked Pressure Cooker Eggs

by Cathy Pollak
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hard-cooker-eggsI love hard boiled eggs. Using them for egg salad and especially for making deviled eggs is always a treat. They are also the perfect high-protein snack right out of the refrigerator.

While I love a good hard cooked egg, I detest peeling off their shells. I have tried every method possible to remove the shell without ruining the egg itself. Nothing has been foolproof. I've also used fresh eggs and old eggs and still nothing has been really successful.

The perfect hard cooked egg is SUPER important when making deviled eggs. The white needs to remain intact instead of looking like a mangled mess. I have found with the pressure cooker, the egg shells are very easy to peel away.

This method doesn't significantly lessen your prep or cooking times, but you do save at the end when it comes to peeling. Totally worth it to me! And your deviled eggs will be pretty.

Regardless of which method you choose, if you are making eggs for Easter and they turn out a mess, this Deviled Egg Spread is the perfect solution. It's one of my favorite appetizers.

Hard Cooked Pressure Cooker Eggs

Recipe by Cathy Pollak for NoblePig.com | Serves: 1 dozen eggs

Ingredients:

12 large eggs
1 cup water

Directions:

Pour 1 cup water into an 8-quart pressure cooker. Set trivet down.

Place a clean dishtowel in the pressure cooker basket. Place eggs on top, weaving the dishtowel around so each egg is protected from each other. This helps the eggs from bumping into each other and cracking. (It's easier to do than it sounds.)

Turn heat on stove to medium-high and bring water to a boil. Place top on pressure cooker and lock securely. When a steady stream of steam begins to pour out, set timer for 6 minutes. At this point you can turn down the heat to medium, making sure a steady release of steam remains.

When done, turn off heat on stove and let pressure drop on its own accord, usually about 15 minutes. (You can always check this by slightly pushing on the pressure valve and seeing if there is still steam inside. Its done when no more steam can be released.) Remove lid.

Let eggs cool before refrigerating.

 

Cathy runs a vineyard and winery in the Willamette Valley of Oregon.  She is a food writer for Davis Life Magazine and blogs daily about wine, food and everyday living.  She lives with her husband and two sons.  You can visit her at noblepig.com.

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