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brunch at the tavern  

Dedicated to the notion that one of the things that’s wrong with the world is that there aren’t enough waffles in it and everyone should sometimes, not all the time, but sometimes order “one for the table”.

-Amy Ephron

 
 

John McCain's Arizona Baked Beans

by John McCain
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Our heartfelt prayers and best wishes go out to Senator McCain - the Editors

Baked Beans1 16oz. can red kidney beans
1 16oz. can B&M baked beans
1 cup ketchup
1 cup packed brown sugar
1 tablespoon butter
1 medium onion-chopped
1 tablespoon vinegar
1 teaspoon yellow French’s mustard
4 strips fried bacon, cooled and crumbled

In a skillet sauté chopped onion with a tablespoon of butter.  In a large baking pot combine kidney beans, B&M baked beans, ketchup, brown sugar, vinegar, mustard, and crumbled bacon.  After combining and stirring enough to mix the ingredients, and the sautéed onions.  Mix well.  Bake in a covered dish at 350-375°F for 35 minutes or until piped hot

The dish is perfect with barbecued food.
ENJOY!

 

Fresh Tomato Cucumber Israeli Chopped Salad

by James Moore
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israeli saladThis simple, fresh, colorful chopped salad can be found everywhere in Israel, from roadside falafel stands to high end restaurants, and is served for breakfast, lunch and dinner. The variations are endless but the base always includes finely chopped tomatoes and cucumbers. I just returned from a truly memorable trip to Israel and highly recommend it as a travel destination.

One of the highlights of the trip was an excursion to Safed, (also known as Zefat, Tsfat, Zfat, Safad, Safes, Safet, Tzfat, etc.) a charming town located in the northern part of Israel. It’s situated at 900 meters (2952 feet) above sea level in the mountains of Galilee and faces east towards Golan, north to Lebanon, west to Mt. Meron and the Amud Valley, and south to Tiberias and the Kinneret.

La Vie Bohème en Giverny – Monet’s Palate

by Nancy Ellison
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Aileen Bordman GivernyNaively, I asked for larks. The grocery clerk seemed perplexed.
      “You know,” I added …  “song birds? And, laurel branches, please.”  

Armed with my shopping list from my 1954 edition of the Alice B Toklas cookbook  (the Hashish Fudge recipe was expunged from that edition) I was beginning life as a newly wed.  I didn’t realize that Alice B Toklas was not Betty Crocker; that our local grocery store in Fort Worth, Texas was not a wildfowl and gourmet food purveyor circa Paris 1920’s; and that I wasn’t cooking for Picasso, Hemingway, Matisse or Braque. I was a recently graduated art student and lookin’ to live La Vie Bohème.  Anything that associated delicious food and painting was what I most wanted in life.  Since I was a woman and not a man-with-a-wife, if I wanted it, I was going to have to do it all myself! And, so … arm in arm with Alice, I started my career as a would-be painter/chef.  Never made Alice’s Larks. However, the super impressed clerks at my market thought I was an authentic epicurean, and I never dared tell them otherwise.

Fresh Cherry and Peach Upside-Down Cake

by Susan Russo
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cherrypeachcakeOne of my favorites cakes to make is my mom's Upside-Down Pineapple Cake, which was her mother's original recipe that is close to 70 years old! However, today I wanted something that celebrated the beginning of summer.

With a gorgeous bowl of tart cherries and some sweet fresh peaches smiling at me, I found my inspiration. I added some freshly squeezed orange juice and zest which compliments the fruit and adds another dimension of flavor.

This is an amazingly light, moist cake that is only made more irresistible by a thick, sugary crust that holds the plump cherries and peaches firmly in place. After one mouthful, you'll wish you could eat it every day.

All About Peaches

by Amy Sherman
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blog-peaches.jpg I have no children, not even a dog or a cat. But I'm considering adopting. Adopting a peach tree that is. Near Fresno, farmer Mas Masumoto and his family grow lovely heirloom varieties of peaches including Sun Crest and Elberta. Their peaches are organic, fragile, absolutely delicious and only available by adoption.

Now I have to admit, I am totally and completely biased towards peaches. They are high in dietary fiber, Vitamin A, Niacin and Potassium, and a very good source of Vitamin C but that's not why I love them so much. Soft, juicy, fuzzy, fragrant and ever so pretty to look at, peaches are the sexiest fruit around.

Because the Elberta variety is so delicate, Mas Masumoto sells his peaches in a most unusual way, he allows people to adopt a tree and harvest all the peaches for personal use. That means a commitment to go to the farm and pick peaches the moment they are ready.

Trisha Yearwood's Home-style French Fries

by Trisha Yearwood
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I’m not sure I ever had a store-bought French fry before high school!  Mama made these home fries and served them with fresh-off-the-grill burgers.

6 medium white or red boiling potatoes
1 tablespoon salt
4 cups peanut oil

Peel the potatoes and slice them into 1/4 by 1/4-inch sticks.  Put the sticks in a large bowl and cover with cold water.  Sprinkle salt into the water.  Refrigerate the potato sticks in the salt water for 1 hour.

In a deep-fryer or cast-iron Dutch oven, heat the peanut oil to 375°F.  Transfer half of the potatoes to a colander and drain thoroughly, leaving the rest in the cold water.  Carefully drop the drained potatoes into the hotel oil and fry until light brown, about 15 minutes.  Using a slotted spoon, remove the potatoes to a paper towel-lined plate and sprinkle with additional salt while still hot, if desired. 

Bring the oil back to 375° F.  Drain the remaining potato sticks and add to the oil.  Keep the first batch of fries hot in a 150° oven while you fry and drain the second batch.

Serve piping hot. 

Courtesy of Trisha Yearwood from her cookbook Georgia Cooking in an Oklahoma Kitchen

 

Bacon BBQ Oysters

by Paul Gerard
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bacon-bbq-oysters"The BBQ oysters were inspired by cookouts I’d have down in New Orleans. My friends and I would pull oysters out of the Gulf, crack them open and throw them on beach fires, and add all kinds of different sauces. Then, when I brought the recipe up to New York, I also was making this BBQ bacon sandwich. I thought, these two would be great together, so I combined the BBQ with the bacon and with the oysters." - Chef Paul Gerard, Exchange Alley, NYC

Oyster Barbecue Sauce:

1 bunch fresh thyme
Extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, chopped
1/4 cup fresh chilies
2 cups ketchup
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup molasses
1/8 cup tablespoons white vinegar
1 tablespoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon pimenton…smoked paprika
Freshly ground black pepper

Moist 7-Up Pound Cake

by James Moore
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7upcake.jpgYears ago, when I was living on Beacon Street in Boston’s Back Bay, I was invited to a rooftop barbecue by my neighbor. Everyone was bringing something, so I thought a pound cake with fresh strawberries would be nice. It was a great party, and the host, who was raised in North Carolina, prepared an elaborate feast of primarily Southern Cuisine – ribs, chicken, baked beans, succotash, corn bread, etc.

When it came time for dessert, everyone seemed to enjoy the pound cake and berries and I asked our host if he liked the cake. He said it was good and asked if I made it with 7UP. When I said that I had NOT, he replied, “then this is pound cake’s cousin – a real pound cake has 7UP in it!” When I saw this recipe in the Summer Entertaining issue of Cook’s Illustrated, I decided to try it. It’s a great buttery cake with a delicious lemon-lime flavor. I guess my neighbor knew what he was talking about!

Mail-Order BBQ

by Amy Ephron
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porkbutt.jpgConfession: I love food that comes in the mail.

I, also love having something in the freezer just in case we decide on a whim to have eight people for dinner tomorrow night. Or tonight for that matter, but this only works if you decide this early enough in the day to defrost whatever it is you have in the freezer just in case you’re entertaining on a whim.

A few weeks ago, I was sent samples from Edwards & Sons Virginia Traditions BBQ. It was summer and I was really excited to get them, especially since the samples included an entire pork roast butt (completely suitable for a dinner party of eight or more).

I don’t write about things that are sent to me unless I love them. Those “crabcakes” from Baltimore come to mind, the ones that sort of resembled a baseball. We tried everything – we even put them in a tomato sauce and put them on top of spaghetti – no luck. A crabcake should not resemble a meatball!

The Herb Brush: A Great Summer BBQ Tool

by Adam Perry Lang
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herb-brush.jpgAny night this summer, you’ll find me hanging with friends, raising a frosty one in the backyard, while the kiddies run around and the guys flip steaks, burgers and chops. Is there anything better?

I’ll be using one of my favorite grilling tools, a do-it-yourself “herb brush” which I use to baste the meat while it cooks. Besides looking cool, it lets you slowly, steadily and subtly layer on the aromatic oils in those herbs, while keeping the meat moist. Using kitchen twine just tie a bunch of fresh herbs (any of your favorites will work: thyme, rosemary, sage, …) to the end of a wooden kitchen spoon. I like a really long spoon and it will make it easier to baste with.

And when you are done basting, you can chop up the herbs and add them to baked beans or sprinkle over grilled vegetables—you can’t do that with a regular basting brush! Herb brushes are great on beef, and on Fourth of July there's nothing I like more than an over 1-inch Rib Eye. Here's how you do it:

Lobster Pot Pie

by Nancy Ellison
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lobster pot pieWhether you choose individual ramekins or create a large pie, this recipe is meant to be general in its directions. Since I have no pastry skills, I will choose what seems the simplest way to make the pastry. Surely you will do better left to your own cleverness.

 

 

 

Amazing Waves

by Clark Little

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