Tangy Sriracha Pumpkin-Parmesan Soup

by Cathy Pollak
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pumpkinsagesoupI'm pretending it's a crisp Fall day and I'm sitting in the sunlight enjoying a warming bowl of this creamy soup. The truth be told...I have the air conditioning turned down to 70 and I am enjoying this soup while wearing shorts and flip-flops. It's a little hot outside.

But the heat, did not stop me from making a spicy soup, in fact, I feel like it nudged me into doing it. We do love Sriracha around here. If you still haven't tried it, it's time!

And this soup is absolutely easy to throw together. Using pumpkin puree makes this an absolute time saver and there is no need for a blender to cream the soup. It couldn't be any more simplistic.

I have had a prolific sage garden this year. It has been growing like crazy. I need to get to work and dry some for the winter months. If you have never had fried sage leaves before, you are in for a treat. They are crispy, little, salty bites of goodness. The perfect addition to a creamy soup.

I hope you are all enjoying the leaves slowing changing to Fall colors. I have already started organizing my sweaters and warm socks. In Oregon the weather changes almost instantly. While it's 90 degrees today, it will be only 50 before I know it.


I hope you enjoy this spicy-tangy soup, it's one of my new faves!

Tangy Sriracha Pumpkin-Parmesan Soup with Fried Sage Leaves
Recipe from: Inspired by Cuisine at Home | Serves: 8 cups


1/2 cup olive oil
24 fresh sage leaves
salt to taste
1 cup finely diced onion
2 Tablespoons minced fresh sage
1 Tablespoon minced garic
1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
4 cups chicken stock or vegetable broth
2 (15 ounce) can pumpkin puree
1/2 cup dry white wine
2 cups shredded Parmesan cheese, plus more for garnish
1 teaspoon table salt
1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 Tablespoon Sriracha
3 tablespoons white wine vinegar


Heat oil in a saute pan until it shimmers. Fry sage leaves in two batches until crispy, about 30 seconds each. Transfer sage leaves to a paper-towel lined plate; season with salt. Reserve 2 Tablespoons of this oil.

In a large pot, saute onion in reserved oil over medium-high heat, about 10 minutes. You want the onion to be very soft, kind of melt-in-your-mouth. Add minced sage, garlic and paprika, saute for about one minute, or until fully incorporated. Stir in broth, pumpkin and wine, bring to a slight, slight boil. Add Parmesan cheese and stir until melted.

Simmer soup covered for about 15-20 minutes.

Stir in heavy cream. Stir in Sriracha 1 Tablespoon at a time. Taste after first addition. This might be enough heat for you, or it might not. Do the same with the vinegar, adding one Tablespoon at a time, tasting after each addition. You might add more, the same or less of the Sriracha and the vinegar to your soup. I feel like heat and tang are very personal choices, so add to your liking. Serve immediately.

Garnish with extra Parmesan and fried sage leaves.


Cathy runs her own vineyard and winery in the Willamette Valley of Oregon.  She is a food writer forDavis Life Magazine and blogs daily about wine, food and everydayliving.  She lives with her husbandand two sons.  You can visit her at noblepig.com.

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