Passover Spinach Ricotta Dumplings

by Amy Sherman
Print Email

ricottagnudiSpinach ricotta gnudi, made with no wheat flour, are my latest recipe, just in time for Passover. Since the Israelites had to flee their oppressors quickly they didn't have time to allow bread to rise, so the story goes. To commemorate that time, during Passover Jews eat foods made with matzo meal or matzo cake meal, but not with regular flour. Most other non-wheat flours are also not allowed.

Gnudi are a little larger and plumper than gnocchi but somewhat similar. Some people think of them as "ravioli without the pasta."  This recipe is very easy because you use one of those "blocks" of frozen spinach. The secret is getting as much water as possible out of the spinach. You want the dough to be very stiff.

Rolling the dumplings in potato starch also helps keep them from falling apart in the water when you boil them. Since I used potato starch instead of flour, these gnudi are also gluten free. I adapted my recipe from the Weelicious recipe for Spinach Gnocchi.

 

The dumplings are primarily made from ricotta and parmesan cheese, so they are very rich. I like them served simply with brown butter and sage, but you could also serve them with tomato sauce if you prefer, but do cook them in butter before adding sauce. When you brown them they get slightly crisp on the outside, without browning they can seem a little gummy.

Passover Spinach Ricotta Dumplings
Serves 4, makes about 35 small dumplings

Ingredients:

10 ounces frozen chopped spinach
1 cup skim milk ricotta cheese
2/3 cup parmesan cheese
1 egg yolk
Pinch fresh grated nutmeg
5 Tablespoons potato starch, divided
1/4 cup unsalted butter
12 fresh sage leaves
3-4 Tablespoons parmesan cheese

Instructions:

Cook the spinach according to instructions, let cool then squeeze all the water out of it as possible using your hands and a colander.

Combine the spinach, ricotta, parmesan cheese, egg yolk, nutmeg and 2 tablespoons potato starch in a medium bowl. Mix until all ingredients are fully incorporated. Use a teaspoon to portion lumps of dough, and roll into balls. Place on a rimmed sheet pan. When all dough is rolled, dust the dumplings with the remaining 3 tablespoons of potato starch and roll them until they are coated on all sides.

Boil a pot of water and add a pinch of salt. Gently place the dumplings in the water and simmer them until they rise to the surface, about 3-4 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon, and place on a plate.

Heat a skillet over medium heat, add the butter. When the butter is melted, add the sage leaves and the drained dumpling. Cook, rolling to brown lightly. Sprinkle with parmesan cheese before serving.

Enjoy!

 

Amy Sherman is a San Francisco–based writer, recipe developer, restaurant reviewer and all around culinary enthusiast. She blogs for Epicurious , Bay Area Bites and Cooking with Amy.

Add comment


Security code
Refresh

 

restaurant news

Dinner and a Show
Michigan
by Ann Nichols

ujai01.jpgThe second of my eating out experiences this week took me to Ukai, a Japanese restaurant in Okemos, Michigan. Chosen by my 11-year-old nephew as the site of his birthday dinner, Ukai occupies a...

Read more...
The Mountain Room
Northern California
by Scott R. Kline

yosemite.jpgThe Mountain Room restaurant at Yosemite Lodge in Yosemite National Park in California is a great place to have a burger after a hike. If you have never visited Yosemite, there are plenty of...

Read more...
Main Street Bakery & Cafe
Colorado
by Haley Schultheis

mainstreetbakery.jpgIf there is one type of restaurant certain to make a list of things I adore, it’s a cozy bakery and café. There is a peaceful and neighborly feel about such a place. Yes, Tiffany’s is to Holly...

Read more...
The Providores and Tapas Room
London - British Isles
by Anna Harari

yog.jpg Can we talk about how strange a yoga class in London is?  Stretch out your kidneys, she kept saying.  Elongate your kidneys.  Her British accent easing me from one pose to another…but…kidneys? ...

Read more...