Chocolate Jelly Ring Sorbet

by Joseph Erdos
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sorbetdonutsAs a kid I always loved eating chocolate-covered jelly rings by the handful. I eagerly looked forward to that time of year when the grocery stores stacked towering boxes of them in the Passover aisle. I still love eating them, but now am glad that I can only find them once a year, otherwise I'd eat them all the time.

Last spring my friend Caroline introduced me to Uncle Louie G's Italian ices and ice cream shop in Brooklyn. Their many flavors are astounding, but what caught my eye that first visit was the chocolate jelly ring Italian ice. I knew right away that I would love it and there was no doubt that I would order it. As Passover rolled around this year I saw those towering boxes of jelly rings in the supermarket and the first thing that popped into my mind was that I had to make a dessert with them.

Here is my kosher for passover dessert, a rich chocolate sorbet made with high-quality melted chocolate and an entire box of chopped jelly rings stirred in. It's a bit different, and some of my Jewish friends may have thought I was crazy for doing it, but once you have a taste, you will surely understand my obsession.

Chocolate Jelly Ring Sorbet

Chocolate sorbet recipe adapted from The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz.

2-1/4 cups water
1 cup sugar
3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
salt
5 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, finely chopped
1 9-ounce box Joyva chocolate-covered ring jells, coarsely chopped

Combine 1-1/2 cups water, sugar, cocoa powder, and a pinch of salt in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil, whisking constantly, and cook for 1 minute.

Off from heat, add chocolate and stir until melted and incorporated. Stir in the remaining 3/4 cup water. Using an immersion blender, blend the mixture until smooth. Chill mixture for at least 2 to 4 hours.

Transfer mixture to ice cream maker and churn for 30 to 40 minutes depending on the machine. Remove to a large chilled bowl and fold in chopped jelly rings. Transfer to a large container, such as a loaf pan, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate until hard, about 12 hours or overnight. Yield: 2 quarts.

 

Joseph Erdos is a New York–based writer and editor, but above all a gastronomer and oenophile. He shares his passion for food on his blog, Gastronomer's Guide , which features unique recipes and restaurant reviews among many other musings on the all-encompassing topic of food. 

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