The Pavlova Story

by James Moore
Print Email

pavlovabookApparently the origin of this meringue-based dessert is somewhat unclear, but seems to have been created in honor of Russian ballet dancer Anna Pavlova’s visit to New Zealand and Australia.

The nationality of its creator has been a source of argument between the two nations for many years, but according to Helen Leach’s research in her book, The Pavlova Story: A Slice of New Zealand's Culinary History, New Zealand is the source of the ethereal dessert.

It’s a fairly easy recipe to master, and although the cloudlike meringue shells are somewhat delicate, they are easy to make in large batches, and will keep for a few days in an airtight container.

They are usually served with fruit and whipped cream, but I prefer this version that incorporates lemon curd. Because you can make the shells ahead, it’s a great dessert for entertaining, and they can be assembled in minutes.

 

Store-bought Lemon Curd is fine to use in this recipe – look for Wilkin and Sons Tiptree Lemon Curd or Dickinson's. Pavlovas are light and refreshing, making them an elegant Spring dessert.

Serves 12.

Meringue Shells

4 large egg whites (about 1/2 cup), at room temperature
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
Pinch of salt
1 cup (7 ounces) sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon white vinegar

Mixed Berries

2cups (10 ounces) raspberries
2 cups (10 ounces) blueberries
1 tablespoon sugar

Lemon Cream Filling

1 cup (1 pint) heavy cream, chilled
1 1/2 cups Lemon Curd, store-bought or homemade
Powdered Sugar and Mint leaves, for garnish, optional

FOR THE MERINGUES:

1. Adjust the oven racks to the upper- and lower-middle positions and heat the oven to 200 degrees. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper.

2. In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat the egg whites at medium-low speed until they are opaque and foamy, about 30 seconds. Add the cream of tartar and salt, increase the speed to medium-high, and, watching carefully, beat the egg whites until they form soft peaks, about 90 seconds. Slowly sprinkle in ½ cup of the sugar and then the vanilla and vinegar and continue to beat until incorporated, about 60 seconds. Remove the bowl from the mixer and sprinkle in the remaining ½ cup sugar and fold in just until incorporated. Using a ¼-cup dry measuring cup and a soupspoon, place 6 heaping ¼-cup dollops of meringue about 1 inch apart on each sheet. Gently press the back of the soupspoon into the center of the mounds to create hollows. Bake for 1½ hours or until the meringues have smooth, dry, and firm exteriors. Turn the oven off and allow the meringues to cool in the oven for two hours. Once cool, store the meringues in an airtight container, where they will keep for 3-4 days, until ready to use.

FOR THE FRUIT:

1. Combine raspberries and blueberries in a medium bowl. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon sugar over the fruit, and using a rubber spatula, stir gently to combine. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside at room temperature until the berries begins to exude their juices, about 30 minutes.

FOR THE LEMON CREAM:

1. Just before serving, beat the cream in a chilled bowl of an electric mixer on low speed until small bubbles form, about 30 seconds. Increase the speed to medium; continue beating until the beaters leave a trail, about 30 seconds more. Increase the speed to high; continue beating until the cream is smooth, thick, and nearly doubled in volume, about 60 seconds for stiff peaks. Beat in the Lemon Curd just until well combined.

TO ASSEMBLE THE PAVLOVAS:

1. Place a meringue shell on a dessert plate. Top with ½ cup lemon cream. Spoon ½ cup of fruit over the lemon cream. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and mint. Repeat with the remaining meringue shells, lemon cream, and fruit. Serve immediately. 

 

James Moore has been a cooking enthusiast since childhood and started blogging as a way to share favorite recipes with friends and family. His site, Cook Like James has grown to include restaurants, cookbooks, wines, and favorite places.

Add comment


Security code
Refresh

 

restaurant news

The Charcoaler Restaurant
Texas
by Scott R. Kline

charcoaler-drive-in-1.jpgThe Charcoaler in El Paso, Texas, looks like it fell out of time capsule from the 1950s. That is a good thing. A beautiful glass fronted open building sits back from busy Mesa Drive with an...

Read more...
The Custom House Tavern
Chicago
by Lisa Dinsmore

chtexterior.jpg I love the fact that my husband is from a different part of the country than I am. Before I met and married him, my experience of America was limited to either coast. Now, every year, I get to...

Read more...
B & G Oysters
Boston
by Kitty Kaufman

bg 3B & G Oysters is one of those places that took off on Day One or at least that's how I remember it. We've had lunch there for years, not years and years, but enough to know that every oyster's...

Read more...
The Apalachicola Seafood Grill and The Piggly Wiggly
Florida
by Ann Nichols

floridagrill.jpg On the second day of our Florida trip, we dined at one of our favorite, always good, “coming home” restaurants in Apalachicola: The Apalachicola Seafood Grill. Located in the heart of “downtown”...

Read more...