Crostini with Prosciutto, Goat Cheese and Fig Jam

by Elaine McCardel
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crostini-horizontalThis may well be our favorite appetizer. The combination of the prosciutto with the luscious fig jam is so good and then the creamy goat cheese - well, you just have to make these.  And (shhhh...) they are so easy!

All you need for these little wonders are a good fresh baguette, a jar of fig jam, some salty prosciutto, plain goat cheese and some fresh basil.  The fig jam is an item which is now found in any grocery store.  You just have to know where to look for it.  Some stores carry it with the jams and some carry it with the international foods.  I know Whole Foods has this brand of jam and they always have some tucked in with all the cheeses.

This stuff is incredible - if you've never had it, you'll want to eat it with a spoon.  Or put it on toast.  Or make a sandwich with it.  Or put it on scrambled eggs.  Okay, you get it.  For the prosciutto, make sure you buy a good quality prosciutto - because there are so few ingredients, this appetizer is only good as the quality of your ingredients.

For my baguette, I actually made my own using this method.  I'm so lucky.  It's a snap to bake up your own in under an hour and I didn't have to run to the bakery to get a fresh one.  I used a baguette mold, which helps the bread retain its shape and not spread out too much.  If you try this, just line it with a folded over clean towel and flour it generously.  When the bread is done resting for about 30 minutes, just roll it off the towel and back onto the baguette  mold and bake.


Crostini with Prosciutto, Goat Cheese and Fig Jam

for a printable recipe, click here

makes six crostini


  • 1 fresh baguette
  • 1/8 cup olive oil
  • sea salt or kosher salt
  • 4 ounces goat cheese, plain, at room temperature
  • 6 tablespoons fig jam
  • 3 slices prosciutto, each cut in half 
  • 6 fresh basil leaves


Preheat oven to 375 F degrees.  

Slice six 1/2-inch slices of bread from the baguette.  I slice mine slightly on the diagonal.  Place on a baking sheet and brush generously with the olive oil. Sprinkle a little salt on each slice.  Bake for about 10 minutes, or until crisp and slightly golden.  Watch that they do not burn.  Remove from oven and cool slightly.

Spread some goat cheese on each crostini.  Spread about a tablespoon of fig jam on top of the goat cheese. Fold the half slices of prosciutto and place on top of each crostini.  Lay a fresh basil leaf on each and serve.


Elaine McCardel shares her love fresh, homemade Italian cooking and food photography on her blog The Italian Dish.    


0 #1 LA Reader 2012-12-31 13:14
these are inspirational. and you could pretend you were in tuscany when you ate them. Thanks for the recipe!

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