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Shaved Artichoke Salad

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10-15 baby artichokes
1 minced clove garlic
2 tablespoons minced fresh chives
1/4 cup olive oil
Juice from 2 medium lemons
1/4 cup shaved Parmesan cheese
Salt
Pepper

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Boil two quarts of water. (Some folks skip this step and just serve them raw. I do it both ways but by blanching the artichokes you insure that they will be the most tender – so try both ways)
2. Peel off outer leaves of artichokes until you reveal the pale green leaves.
3. Finely cut the artichokes crosswise. You really want to slice as finely as possible. Put the sliced chokes in a non reactive bowl like stainless steel. Toss with a teaspoon of the lemon. This prevents the chokes from turning too dark.
4. Put sliced chokes in boiling water for 30 seconds and remove and let completely cool.
5. In a non reactive bowl pour oil, remaining lemon juice, pinch of salt and pepper and mix well.
6. When artichokes cooled, toss with lemon dressing. Add more salt and pepper to taste – usually another pinch of each. Add shaved Parmesan and toss again. Refrigerate.

Serves 4 (Great with a thick slice of ciabatta.)

©Paul Mones

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